Vitamin K research at the Better Bones Foundation

susanfoundationVitamin K has long been used as a successful therapy for osteoporosis in Japan. In that country, a high-dose formulation of a synthetic form of vitamin K2 has been shown effective at significantly reducing the incidence of both hip and spinal fractures.

In the US, dietary vitamin K in nutritional doses is being increasingly recognized as one of the most underappreciated key bone-building nutrients. Several studies have linked higher vitamin K intake with increased bone mineral density. Further, in addition to its bone-building effects, vitamin K also plays a central role in the prevention of arterial calcification. It appears that, vitamin K works to attach calcium molecules to bone and to prevent calcium from accumulating in the arteries.

We at the Better Bones Foundation are especially interested in the bone-building potential of the natural K2 subforms of this nutrient, particularly the form known as MK-7. In nature, MK-7 is found in the Japanese fermented soy product known as natto, in various other fermented foods such as kimchee and sauerkraut, and in certain hard cheeses. In Japan, populations consuming regular amounts of natto experience better bone health, and it is likely that supplementation with natural MK-7 will bring similar benefits to Western populations. Currently Dr. Susan E. Brown, PhD, is developing research protocol to look at the impact of natural MK-7 on bone resorption among those experiencing high bone breakdown. We are also seeking funding to conduct a comprehensive scientific literature review and a comprehensive rethinking of the many roles of vitamin K in bone and systemic health.

At the Better Bones Foundation we promote an all-natural approach to bone health based on the latest research and through consultation, education and outreach.

If you would like to help us further the work of the Better Bones Foundation, click here to make a donation. We are also happy to answer questions about Dr. Brown’s pioneering work in the field of bone health. Please call The Center for Better Bones today toll-free at 1-888-206-7119 to learn more.

Vitamin D research at the Better Bones Foundation

Better Bones Foundation

Breaking new research from around the world indicates that obtaining the appropriate amount of vitamin D might well be the simplest and most cost-effective way to protect your bone health. New studies suggest that this optimal amount of vitamin D is much higher than the minimum levels needed to prevent patent vitamin D deficiency diseases. The same emerging body of research also documents widespread vitamin D inadequacy and deficiency.

Dr. Susan E. Brown, PhD, in collaboration with the Better Bones Foundation, is conducting a comprehensive Vitamin D Research and Awareness Project, Vitamin D: An old bone builder takes on new importance. In this important article Dr. Brown summarizes the new vitamin D research. Further, she details how and why you should have your own vitamin D level tested.

A second element in our current Vitamin D Research and Awareness Project concerns an ongoing meta-analysis of scientific studies on vitamin D and fracture reduction. The results of this meta-analysis were published in 2008, Vitamin D and fracture reduction: an evaluation of the existing research. By signing up for our Better Bones e-newsletter, you can receive immediate notification from the foundation when similar articles become available.

Currently the third element of the project concerns the preparation of additional reports documenting the importance of adequate vitamin D levels for the prevention of a variety of degenerative diseases, ranging from 16 types of cancer to diabetes, heart disease, depression, and autoimmune disease.

The fourth and final element of our Vitamin D Research and Awareness Project concerns raising public awareness by sponsoring and co-sponsoring conferences, workshops, and seminars on vitamin D. These educational initiatives have included sessions on the links between vitamin D and children’s health, vitamin D, and heart health, and most recently in 2008, a public event we co-sponsored in Syracuse, New York on “What you should know about vitamin D to prevent osteoprosis and hip fracture.”

At the Better Bones Foundation we promote an all-natural approach to bone health based on the latest research and through consultation, education and outreach.

If you would like to help us further the work of the Better Bones Foundation, click here to make a donation. We are also happy to answer questions about Dr. Brown’s pioneering work in the field of bone health. Please call The Center for Better Bones today toll-free at 1-888-206-7119 to learn more.

How to support the Better Bones Foundation

Better Bones Foundation

susanfoundationThe Better Bones Foundation, a nonprofit research and education organization, is funded through consulting, research and lecture services, the sale of our books and programs, and donations.

Your gift of any amount will help further our mission to research natural ways to promote better bones and a better body. For gifts of $100 or greater, we will send you an autographed copy of Dr. Brown’s groundbreaking book, Better Bones, Better Body.

Individuals, organizations, and corporations who would like to further contribute to our work and vision are invited to fully or partially sponsor an individual project of the Better Bones Foundation. These projects involve primary and secondary research efforts, lectures and educational events, and public awareness campaigns. Current projects in need of sponsorship include:

If you would like additional information on becoming a donor or are interested in collaborating in our bone health research and/or osteoporosis education efforts, please contact us at:

The Better Bones Foundation
605 Franklin Park Drive
East Syracuse NY 13057
e-mail: info@betterbones.com
Tel: (315) 432-1676 — Fax: (315) 432-9231

At the Better Bones Foundation we promote an all-natural approach to bone health based on the latest research and through consultation, education and outreach.

If you would like to help us further the work of the Better Bones Foundation, click here to make a donation. We are also happy to answer questions about Dr. Brown’s pioneering work in the field of bone health. Please call The Center for Better Bones today toll-free at 1-888-206-7119 to learn more.

Research and publications on acid-alkaline balance

Better Bones Foundation

susanfoundationThe relationship between bone and systemic acid-base balance is considered by Dr. Susan Brown and the Better Bones Foundation to be one of critical importance. Indeed, it is our opinion that chronic low-grade metabolic acidosis can be seen as the major hidden cause of osteoporosis. To that end, we explore in full the relationship between bone and systemic pH (acid-base balance) in our book, Better Bones, Better Body and in our article Acid-alkaline balance and its effect on bone health. Additionally, one of the primary goals of the Better Bones Foundation is to conduct original research on pH balance and bone. Our first piece of research focused on the value of first-morning urine pH measurements, and the second on interstitial cystitis and pH balance. Below we discuss in more detail our research on this topic to date.

First morning urine pH measurement

One of the Better Bones Foundation’s primary projects on acid-alkaline balance involved collaborative research with Dr. Susan Whiting, of the University of Saskatchewan, on the relationship between first morning urine pH measurement and net acid load. The abstract of these findings on the value of first morning urine pH measurement, as presented at the 2002 ASBMR (American Society for Bone and Mineral Research) meeting by investigators Susan Whiting, PhD, Janet Bell, and Susan E. Brown, PhD, CCN, is provided below.

First morning urine measured with pH paper strips reflects acid excretion

Susan J. Whiting and Janet Bell, College of Pharmacy and Nutrition, University of Saskatchewan, 110 Science Place, Saskatoon, SK, S7N 5C9; and Susan E. Brown, Better Bones Foundation, 605 Franklin Park Drive, East Syracuse, NY 13057.

Net acid excretion (NAE) is implicated in bone loss, as increased calcium loss is seen with a high net acid excretion. Dietary protein is identified as a significant producer of acid, whereas fruits and vegetables may counteract this effect through the production of metabolizable organic anions which buffer acid. Determination of NAE is important in recognizing the effect diet may have on bone. Most commonly, a 24-hour urine collection is obtained for measurement of NAE, where NAE is measured as titratable acidity minus bicarbonate (TA – bicarb) plus ammonium NH4+. However, this measurement can be inconvenient, and pH measured on first morning urine with semi-quantitative paper strips may be a practical estimator of NAE. We recruited 23 (4M, 19F) healthy subjects ages 20–50 y, who recorded dietary intake for a day during which they collected urine from approximately 7 am to 11 pm in one container (“day”), and approximately 11 pm to 7 am (“overnight,” ON) in a separate container. The first morning void contained ON urine. Subjects also provided a 2-hour fasting urine at 9 am. Paper pH strips (colorpHast ®, EM-Reagents, range 4–7) were used to measure pH of the ON urine, as would be done in practice. A second set of strips (pH range 6.5–10) was used if initial pH read high. Although measurement with pH paper strips was not significantly correlated with 24-hr NAE, there was a significant correlation with 24-hour TA – bicarb (r = –0.466, p<0.025). Further, pH strip measures were significantly correlated with ON NAE (r = -0.710, p<0.005). We noted that ON NAE was correlated with total NAE (r = 0.504, p<0.014). We conclude there is useful information is measuring first morning urine pH (which provides pH of urine formed overnight) to obtain an estimate of acid excretion. Paper pH strips appear to be useful in the absence of longer (more invasive) urine collections.

Dr. Susan Brown and the nonprofit Better Bones Foundation continue to actively solicit collaboration and exchange with other like-minded individuals and organizations concerned with the practical health implications of chronic low-grade metabolic acidosis. If you are interested in helping the Better Bones Foundation through funding, or have ideas on how we might fund any of our current research, please visit our section on how to support the Better Bones Foundation.

At the Better Bones Foundation we promote an all-natural approach to bone health based on the latest research and through consultation, education and outreach.

If you would like to help us further the work of the Better Bones Foundation, click here to make a donation. We are also happy to answer questions about Dr. Brown’s pioneering work in the field of bone health. Please call The Center for Better Bones today toll-free at 1-888-206-7119 to learn more.

The Children’s Bone Health Initiative

Better Bones Foundation

susanfoundationRethinking the pediatric origins of osteoporosis

Project description and request for funding

A major research, education, and advocacy effort for the future concerns children’s bone health. This project, known as the Children’s Bone Health Initiative, undertakes a comprehensive rethinking of the pediatric origins of osteoporosis and practical program development. All funds and donations procured for the Children’s Bone Health Initiative will be dedicated solely to this project. All contributions are tax-exempt and all sponsors will be fully appreciated and recognized in our publications, during our lectures and presentations, and on our website. In addition, Dr. Brown would be available to make special presentations, or write individual reports, on the project’s findings and advocacy statements for sponsoring groups and agencies.

Overview of the Children’s Bone Health Initiative 2008

Step 1: Research and rethinking

For over a decade we at the Better Bones Foundation have served as a “thought leader” in the field, rethinking the true nature, causes, and best prevention and treatment of osteoporosis. Our research findings and bone health programs are available through our book, Better Bones, Better Body, our published articles, and our website, which are nationally recognized for providing state-of-the-art bone health information.

Our analysis of the causes of osteoporosis suggests that this silent crippler begins in childhood. Indeed, one-half of all adult bone mass is laid down during puberty and the teen years. Furthermore, a full quarter of adult bone mass is built during adolescence. Much of the osteoporosis epidemic among older individuals could be resolved if children were to achieve their full genetic potential for peak bone mass. Indeed, bone mass acquired during childhood and adolescence is a key determinant of adult bone health. Equally striking is the fact that an increasing number of factors, ranging from lifestyle habits to degenerative disease, now compromise youthful bone development.

Our first step in rethinking the pediatric origins of osteoporosis will be to conduct a systematic review of current literature on the topic. This review will include:

  • Analysis of the theoretical discussions concerning the pediatric origins of osteoporosis
  • Our comments, critiques, and additions to this body of theory
  • A meta-analysis of published research on childhood bone health (retrospective, prospective, epidemiological, and intervention studies)
  • Our observations on the importance and limitations of the current research
  • Identification of promising areas for future research

Step 2: New materials development

With this information and anticipated new perspectives in hand, we will then undertake a practical education program to raise public awareness about the importance of building bone health during youth. We will clarify how puberty and the teen years represent a once-in-a-lifetime window of opportunity to build high-quality bone mass, and how simple interventions can maximize a child’s lifelong potential for optimal bone health.

Of special importance to this education and public awareness component will be the development of practical nutrition, exercise, and lifestyle guidelines, and self-help programs. The best of the scientific findings will be integrated into effective, manageable self-help programs. One important focus, for example, will be on family programs, and in particular mother–child programs. This is an especially important aspect of children’s bone health, as most prepubertal children at higher risk of osteoporosis in later life have mothers with low bone density. Another focus will be simple, inexpensive, proven bone-building exercise programs for family and classroom use. These exercise programs will be of special value to children without access to regular physical education or sports activities.

Step 3: The public awareness campaign

The Better Bones Foundation is a public-interest endeavor focused on the exploration of the human potential for bone health optimization within contemporary society. We freely share our research findings and innovative self-help programs with interested groups and individuals worldwide. The Better Bones Foundation does not seek proprietary ownership over the programs and educational materials within the Children’s Bone Health Initiative.

As now envisioned, these new materials and perspectives will be widely disseminated through various means, including educational seminars and presentations, all-media press releases, popular and professional articles, self-help manuals for parents and children, the Better Bones Foundation website, other internet publications, and the like. In addition, this initiative will link with, and help publicize already existing private and governmental bone health education efforts.

Budget

The budget for the Children’s Bone Health Initiative is set at $30,000, the sum of $10,000 being dedicated to each of the three project steps described above. If you, your organization, or someone you know would like to contribute to the funding of this project, please contact Dr. Susan E. Brown, PhD at 315-437-9384.

At the Better Bones Foundation we promote an all-natural approach to bone health based on the latest research and through consultation, education and outreach.

If you would like to help us further the work of the Better Bones Foundation, click here to make a donation. We are also happy to answer questions about Dr. Brown’s pioneering work in the field of bone health. Please call The Center for Better Bones today toll-free at 1-888-206-7119 to learn more.

Geriatric fracture reduction and the special nutrient needs of the elderly

Better Bones Foundation

susanfoundationResearch on geriatric bone health from the Better Bones Foundation

Current research now documents that the elderly often exhibit special, unmet nutrient needs, which contribute significantly to their increased risk of osteoporotic fracture. This secondary research project compiles and reanalyzes this data towards an end goal of proposing updated nutrition guidelines for the osteoporotic elderly population.

At the Better Bones Foundation we promote an all-natural approach to bone health based on the latest research and through consultation, education and outreach.

If you would like to help us further the work of the Better Bones Foundation, click here to make a donation. We are also happy to answer questions about Dr. Brown’s pioneering work in the field of bone health. Please call The Center for Better Bones today toll-free at 1-888-206-7119 to learn more.

Completed research at the Better Bones Foundation

Better Bones Foundation

susanfoundationWith a mission to explore the full human potential for bone health development, maintenance, and regeneration, medical anthropologist, clinical nutritionist, and osteoporosis expert Dr. Susan Brown, PhD, Director of the nonprofit Better Bones Foundation, has been researching nutrition and lifestyle influences on bone health for many years now. Some of the research projects Dr. Brown has completed through the Foundation are listed below.

Acid–alkaline studies

Dr. Susan Brown and the Better Bones Foundation consider the link between bone health and systemic acid-alkaline balance to be one of critical importance. In fact, it is our opinion that chronic low-grade metabolic acidosis(CLGMA) is one of the major hidden causes of osteoporosis.

With that, Dr. Brown has studied and written extensively on acid-alkaline balance and its effects on bone health. In her book, Better Bones, Better Body, she dedicates two full chapters to acid-alkaline balance and bone and to the development of an Alkaline for Life® diet. And in their scholarly article, “Acid-alkaline balance and its effects on bone health,” Dr. Brown and Dr. Russell Jaffe explore the full connection between bone and systemic pH and present the scientific data on this relationship.

In addition, Dr. Brown has authored a book entirely dedicated to clarifying the overall importance of proper acid-alkaline body chemistry balance. This book, The Acid-Alkaline Food Guide (Square One Publishers, 2006), provides the lay public with a detailed, yet understandable, discussion of chronic low-grade metabolic acidosis. Further, this book offers the first comprehensive listing of the relative acidifying or alkalizing impact of all major foods.

Clinical pilot studies

  • Young Bones™

As detailed in her book, Better Bones, Better Body, Dr. Susan Brown believes traditional Chinese medicine offers us a profound understanding of bone loss processes and the mechanics of bone health maintenance. In this research pilot study she had the opportunity to evaluate a promising 1000-year-old traditional Chinese herbal bone health formula. This research project consisted of a three-month pilot study that measured the impact of this traditional herbal formula on symptoms of menopause and aging, and bone breakdown. Young Bones was found to be a powerful kidney-enhancing, anti-aging formula. For details please see her report, Pilot clinical study of dietary supplement, Young Bones™ — a traditional Chinese herbal formula for improvement of aging, including bone mineral loss, pain, mobility, and nocturnal polyuria in women.

  • Cal-Vantage

This pilot study involved a three-month clinical trial assessing the bone-building potential of Cal-Vantage — a unique vitamin–mineral and herbal formula. The endpoints for this study were bone resorption at six and 12 weeks, blood pressure, and weight. The results of this pilot study showed Cal-Vantage to be a promising bone-building agent, the use of which was also associated with positive changes in weight and blood pressure. Dr. Brown found these results promising and extended this study for one year to evaluate the impact of Cal-Vantage™ on bone mineral density in postmenopausal women. For details please read the study report, Pilot clinical study assessing the impact on bone resorption and bone mineral density of the dietary supplement Cal-Vantage™.

  • OsteOrganiCAL®

Dr. Brown has conducted two research projects with the Brazilian sea algae calcium and vitamin D bone product known as OsteOrganiCAL. The first was a series of case studies, and the second, a one-year pilot clinical study on bone density.

Case studies
In 1997 the product known as OsteOrganiCAL was brought to our attention. In subsequent years Dr. Brown was presented with dozens of before-and-after bone density measurements which suggested this formulation was indeed capable of halting bone loss and even rebuilding a significant amount of bone. Intrigued by these results Dr. Brown agreed to review a series of these cases, checking to validate their accuracy. The results were reported in the OsteOrganiCAL case study analysis.

One-year pilot clinical study
Intrigued by the impressive bone density improvements found in the case studies, Dr. Brown became engaged in a clinical pilot trial. In the fall of 2003, Dr. Brown and her staff at the Better Bones Foundation completed a year-long pilot study of this formulation containing the sea algae calcium and vitamin D. The study included eleven postmenopausal women, six of whom experienced impressive gains in bone mineral density from use of the product. For the full study report, you are referred toOsteOrganiCAL pilot study final report.

  • AdvaCAL® (AAACa)

Over the years there has been considerable attention given to the issue of calcium effectiveness and bioavailability. In this small (N=11), four-week pilot study, Dr. Brown compared a promising Japanese calcium formula with calcium citrate. The endpoints of this pilot study were alterations to bone resorption, intact parathyroid hormone, and first-morning urine pH amongst North American postmenopausal women. In each case, the subject received 900 mg of elemental calcium in a dosing regimen of 150 mg with each meal, and 450 mg at bedtime. This dosing regimen was likely an important factor in producing a consistent reduction in bone resorption within only four weeks. In this small study formal statistical analysis was not able to detect a significant difference between the effects of these two forms of calcium on any end point studied. From a case study perspective, however, there was a trend favoring AAACa over calcium citrate in reducing bone resorption markers. To read the full report of this study, see A pilot study comparing Advacal (AAACa) and calcium citrate supplementation in menopausal US women.

Ipriflavone report and usage guidelines

Between the years 1998–2001, Dr. Brown worked with Technical Sourcing International of Missoula, Montana, to research the efficacy and safety of the synthetic flavonoid known as ipriflavone (trade name Ostivone). During that time she developed a comprehensive database on all available English language studies on ipriflavone. Dr. Brown also completed her own analysis of ipriflavone. This analysis includes an introduction to flavonoids, a history and background of ipriflavone, a discussion of its efficacy, the safety concerns with its use, and a summary of the 2000 European multicentered clinical trial using ipriflavone. Those wishing further information on the results are referred to the report on ipriflavone and Italian guidelines for its usage.

NTx point-of-care device

In February 2001, the Better Bones Foundation served as one of four nationwide test sites for a clinical trial evaluating the Osteomark NTx point-of-care device. The object of this clinical trial was to see if the NTx measurement device could be self-administered at home. This study was conducted in compliance with FDA requirements. Principal investigators were Nancy Mallinak, PhD and Susan E. Brown, PhD. This study led to the approval of this device by the FDA and its subsequent distribution.

If you are interested in helping the Better Bones Foundation through funding, or have ideas on how we might fund any of our current osteoporosis research, please see our section on supporting the Better Bones Foundation.

At the Better Bones Foundation we promote an all-natural approach to bone health based on the latest research and through consultation, education and outreach.

If you would like to help us further the work of the Better Bones Foundation, click here to make a donation. We are also happy to answer questions about Dr. Brown’s pioneering work in the field of bone health. Please call The Center for Better Bones today toll-free at 1-888-206-7119 to learn more.

Better Bones Foundation

The Better Bones Foundation is a 501(c)(3) non-profit, public interest research and education organization dedicated to rethinking the nature, causes, prevention, and best treatment of osteoporosis. Firmly grounded in a unified anthropological perspective, the Better Bones Foundation is committed to the development of natural programs for the regeneration of bone health worldwide. It is directed by Susan E. Brown, PhD, CNS, medical anthropologist and certified clinical nutritionist.

With its commitment to working with nature to maximize bone health, The Better Bones Foundation dedicates itself to programs that build not only better bones, but better bodies as well. Thus we propose that every intervention or therapy to build bone health should also be good for the entire body.

The first endeavor of the Better Bones Foundation was to undertake a comprehensive rethinking of the true nature, causes, prevention, and best treatment of osteoporosis. To this end, ten years of research were dedicated to our first publication, Better Bones, Better Body: Beyond Estrogen and Calcium, A Comprehensive Self-Help Program for Preventing, Halting and Overcoming Osteoporosis. During this time we also co-authored a comprehensive text on natural remedies for menopause and beyond, The Mend Clinic Guide to Natural Medicine for Menopause and Beyond (Dell Publishing, 1997). More recently, in 2006 we completed a comprehensive guide to the impact of foods on acid-alkaline balance, (The Acid-Alkaline Food Guide “Square One Publishers, with Larry Trivieri, Jr.”). Also in 2006, Dr. Brown wrote a definitive chapter on bone nutrition for a new medical textbook edited by Ingrid Kohlstadt (Scientific Evidence for Musculoskeletal, Bariatric, and Sports Nutrition, Taylor & Francis).

The second phase of our work includes the implementation of clinical trials on natural programs to prevent, halt, and reverse osteoporosis. To date we have conducted several trials looking at the impact of key nutrient combinations on bone health. See our current research or completed research to learn more.

The third phase of our work involves wide public implementation of our successful clinical bone health regeneration program, known as the Women’s Health Network Personal Program for Better Bones. After years of research we now know how to prevent, halt, and often reverse osteoporosis naturally without medications. This stage of our work requires considerable public outreach in the form of books, brochures, booklets, lectures, press releases, and the like.

In its effort to expand awareness about the human potential for natural bone health and regeneration, the Better Bones Foundation welcomes contributions and collaboration from interested individuals and companies.

The Better Bones Foundation is located in East Syracuse, NY. If you would like more information or you are interested in collaborating in our research and/or educational efforts, please call our office at 315-432-1676.

Accomplishments by the Better Bones Foundation

Books

Research and writing of a major trade book rethinking the nature, causes, prevention, and best treatment of osteoporosis — Better Bones, Better Body (Keats 1996, 2000). Publication of a second key bone health book — The Acid-Alkaline Food Guide (Square One Publishers 2006), with Larry Trivieri, Jr.

Website

Development of the extensive, educational BBF website, www.BetterBones.com. This website offers our research and educational studies and reports.

The Better Bones Blog

Twice each month, Susan Brown’s blog, The Better Bones Blog, offers in-depth analysis of a single aspect of bone health. Topics analyzed will range from the new research on vitamin D and fracture reduction to the role of vitamin K in building bone strength. The Better Bones Blog is distributed to thousands of individuals and is often republished by various sectors.

Primary research

Over the years, Dr. Brown has conducted several clinical trials (pilot studies) on selected promising bone-building nutrient formulas. To learn more, see current bone research studies or completed bone health research.

Secondary research

Research on topics such as bone nutrition, acid-alkaline balance and bone, vitamin D, and the 20 key bone-building nutrients has gained BBF worldwide recognition. To learn more, see current bone research studies or completed bone health research.

Public bone health education

Through BBF, Dr. Brown has written and published dozens of articles for the public, and has given more than a hundred lectures, television, and radio performances in the US and abroad. Much of this material can be found at our website, betterbones.com. In 2004, BBF began a vitamin D awareness project, and in 2006, a brochure series on “Rethinking Osteoporosis.”

Medical Professional Education

Dr. Brown has developed and delivered numerous continuing medical education courses for physicians and allied health professionals. A list of these can be found in our library section for health professionals.

At the Better Bones Foundation we promote an all-natural approach to bone health based on the latest research and through consultation, education and outreach.

If you would like to help us further the work of the Better Bones Foundation, click here to make a donation. We are also happy to answer questions about Dr. Brown’s pioneering work in the field of bone health. Please call The Center for Better Bones today toll-free at 1-888-206-7119 to learn more.

Current research at the Better Bones Foundation

Better Bones Foundation

susanfoundationThe Better Bones Foundation is a non-profit, tax-exempt advocacy, research, and education organization founded in 1986. The Foundation is committed to the mission of rethinking the nature and causes of osteoporosis, and with this new understanding to develop natural, life-supporting programs for building, maintaining, and regenerating bone health at all ages.

Located in East Syracuse, NY, the Better Bones Foundation was founded and is directed by Dr. Susan E. Brown PhD, CCN, a medical anthropologist and certified clinical nutritionist. The Better Bones Foundation actively seeks collaboration with other individuals, institutions, charities, and businesses committed to public-interest health research, education, and advocacy. Funding for the basic overhead and maintenance of this public-interest 501(c)(3) corporation is generated from the sales of our book, Better Bones, Better Body (Keats 2000), our articles, and from distribution of the Women’s Health Network Better Bones Package.

Each of our research, education, and advocacy programs is funded on a project-by-project basis by individuals, organizations, charities, and commercial concerns that share our commitment to exploring the full human potential for bone health maintenance and regeneration. At this time we are seeking project funding for fiscal year 2009–2010 on.

In conjunction with the Better Bones Foundation, Dr. Brown conducts research and clinical pilot studies designed to explore the nutritional and lifestyle factors influencing bone health. Another large segment of research conducted at the Better Bones Foundation focuses on acid-alkaline balance and bone. The Better Bones Foundation is interested in further identifying the role that the body’s requirement for acid-alkaline balance plays in bone health and, conversely, the role that bone plays in the all-important maintenance of internal acid-alkaline balance.

Current additional areas of research at the foundation involve rethinking the impact of, and requirements for vitamin D; research into the pediatric origins of osteoporosis; and research into fracture reduction and special nutrient needs of the elderly. Currently we are soliciting funding for these and other important education projects.

If you are interested in helping us fund, or have ideas on how we might fund any of our current osteoporosis research, please see our section on supporting the Better Bones Foundation.

Current bone health and osteoporosis research projects

Toxic Metal and Bone Strength
A wide variety of toxicants have negative effects on bone health. And we are exposed to many of these toxins on a daily basis. Within this research project,  Dr. Brown investigates the impacts of heavy metals on bone health and osteoporosis and she offers a “Better Bones Action Program for Assessing and Managing Toxic Metals.” Selected findings from this research project are presented in Dr. Brown’s Progressive Medical Education webinar of Feb. 15, 2016 entitled “Osteoporosis and Toxicant Exposure: Assessment and Management.”

The Children’s Bone Health Initiative

We are currently in the developmental stages and soliciting funds for an important public awareness campaign focused on children’s bone health. For more details on this important public awareness project and to review our request for project funding, see the Children’s Bone Health Initiative.

Fracture reduction and special nutrient needs of the elderly

To read more about the secondary research being conducted at the Better Bones Foundation on this important topic, see our project description: Geriatric fracture reduction and the special nutrient needs of the elderly.

Key bone-building nutrient research

Recently the Better Bones Foundation has recognized the need for comprehensive rethinking and raising public awareness about the bone health importance of two key nutrients. These nutrients are vitamin D and vitamin K. There is new, little-known research breaking on both these vitamins that stands to alter the way we treat and prevent osteoporosis.

To read more about our research initiatives on these bone-critical nutrients, see the following:

To read more about the work done through the Better Bones Foundation in the past, see our section on completed research initiatives.

At the Better Bones Foundation we promote an all-natural approach to bone health based on the latest research and through consultation, education and outreach.

If you would like to help us further the work of the Better Bones Foundation, click here to make a donation. We are also happy to answer questions about Dr. Brown’s pioneering work in the field of bone health. Please call The Center for Better Bones today toll-free at 1-888-206-7119 to learn more.