The Better Bones Blog

by Dr. Susan Brown, PhD.

My Better Bones Builder

Why I created Better Bones Better Body® and the Better Bones Builder

As an anthropologist I could see that osteoporosis was not something that occurred to aging women and men all over the world. Even more, it was obvious that conventional medicine did not hold the answer to lifelong bone health.

As I came to fully understand the nature and causes of osteoporosis, I developed a burning desire to help solve the growing epidemic of poor bone health.

My goal became to develop a nutritional and lifestyle program which would allow all motivated individuals to enjoy life-long bone health. And, after two decades of research and clinical practice, I reached that goal when I developed the Better Bones Better Body® Program.

To provide motivated individuals with the optimum bone health supplement, I realized I had to create it — so I did just that.

See the video of Dr. Brown’s Grandma at 102 years old with Osteoporosis & Rickets which inspired Dr.Brown to make this her life’s work. 

Filling the gap with the best bone supplement for women

Early in my career, I uncovered a huge problem when it came to bone health supplements. No supplement existed that had all the nutrients in the dosage and forms I knew women really needed. Thousands of hours of research made this shortcoming very clear to me. Sure, there was calcium, but hundreds of research reports made it obvious that getting more calcium alone won’t do much for the health of your bones.

In one way of another all the bone supplements women could buy over the counter were incomplete and doomed to be ineffective.

Here’s why other supplements didn’t work:

  • None of the available bone supplements contained all the 20+ key nutrients I knew to be essential for optimum skeletal health
  • None offered the best form and proper dosage of the included nutrients,
  • None were designed to alkalize.

And even more, I formulated this product to be not only the optimum bone builder, but also to serve as your “all in one” comprehensive multivitamin/mineral. The unique supplement is known as Better Bones Builder.

Additionally, the good news is that more and more there is strong research coming out on bone health. And I keep evolving the Better Bones Builder formula, based on new clinical practice evidence and the best research about how nutrients can prevent bone loss.

Would you like to learn more about a specific nutrient? All you have to do is click on each nutrient’s name to study a selection of the research studies and articles about it: 20 key bone-building nutrients — an overview.

Why I choose to sell my supplements online

Occasionally I am taken to task by a blog subscriber who asks why I design and sell supplements…Why don’t I just write about my solutions of the poor bone health epidemic? My response is simple, after decades of research and clinical practice I know a safe and effective way to help everyone develop Better Bones and a Better Body and I am happy and proud to offer this solution to as many people as possible.

By the way, I give kudos to my readers for being so diligent about health information and products! It always is important to ask questions and take a look at sources and references for information. I invite you to do so for every Better Bones blog, article and product.

Finally, I hope you’ll make the investment in yourself by using the Better Bones Builder. But if not, you can still get my weekly insights about current bone health research and how to incorporate it into your everyday life. I’ll keep sorting the fact from fiction when it comes to bone health so that you can continue to get all of the benefits of the natural approach.

I send each of you my very best wishes for Better Bones and a Better Body!

 

why bone talk is important to you

Your bones listen and talk…really!

Our skeleton might seem like a silent partner that quietly provides us with a solid framework, a place for muscles to attach, an incubator for red blood cells and a gigantic storehouse for alkaline mineral compounds. In reality, however, our bones are anything but silent. Like text messages pinging back and forth on a smart phone, our bones and our bodies are in constant conversation.

What are they talking about?

Bones are the body’s “great communicator”

When your body talks to your bones, it does so through chemical messengers you’re likely familiar with: hormones like estrogen, progesterone, testosterone, growth factors, thyroid and parathyroid hormones, and vitamin D, among others.  This larger endocrine system regulates the development, maintenance and renewal of bone. Your amazing skeleton listens to these silent chemical messages very carefully — but it not only receives messages, it also sends them out to every other tissue in the body, creating a complex network of information flowing out of the bones.

Here’s a simplified overview of how our skeleton “talks” through the hormones it produces:

Osteocalcin: This osteoblast-derived hormone helps regulate whole-body energy metabolism and blood sugar control by stimulating the production of insulin. It also stimulates the brain to impact memory and mood. In men, osteocalcin encourages the testicles to produce testosterone.

Lipocalcin 2: A hormone dispatched by bone to help fight bacterial infections, manage fat as an important fuel source, and talk to the brain about appetite control.

Sclerostin: A bone-derived hormone known to control bone growth. Sclerostin is also dispatched by bone to manage fat as an important fuel source. In mice this hormone helps convert “bad” white fat to energy-burning beige or brown fat.

Leptin and adiponectin: These two hormones are produced by the bone marrow and white adipose (fat) tissue. Leptin is a key regulator of energy homeostasis and acts as an indicator of the body’s long-term energy reserves.  This hormone signals the hypothalamus to regulate satiety, energy balance, fertility and immune function.  Without leptin, you have insatiable hunger and obesity develops.

Adiponectin: This is a protein produced by bone marrow fat cells (adipocytes). Decreased circulating adiponectin is an established biomarker for increased risk of cardiometabolic diseases.

Fibroblast growth factor 23 (FGF 23): Bones use this messenger to tell the kidneys to rid the body of extra phosphates that build up in certain genetic disorders.

Why “bone talk” is important to you

Our skeleton is a very complex and intelligent organ directing system-wide essential functions. Much of this bone-derived chat is aimed at regulating whole-body energy metabolism, glucose control and appetite control—areas where bones benefit from being in the driver’s seat because our skeleton needs a great deal of energy to maintain and renew itself on a constant basis. Caring for our bones, we literally help care for the entire body.

Modern science is only beginning to understand the vast field of information and intelligence we identify as our body, and it’s on the brink of linking bone health to the development of diseases like diabetes and obesity. Bringing your awareness to the “wonders of you” enlivens that intelligence and enhances your well-being.

 

mind body bone connection

Mind over muscle — how using your brain could help your bones

Perhaps you’ve heard of the “placebo effect” in clinical trials — that strange situation when some people who don’t receive a beneficial intervention see a benefit to their health anyway, for no obvious reason. By way of explanation, most clinical researchers think that when participants believe they will improve because of the “treatment,” their body takes its cue from the mind and responds as if a therapeutic agent is actually being used.

If only we could capture this seemingly magical ability of the mind to direct the body — what could it do for our own ability to heal?

Mental imagery makes a difference

In fact, a few years ago, some researchers showed that we can capture this ability (Clark et al. 2014). They induced muscle weakness in 29 adult volunteers — healthy people who had more or less similar muscle strength at baseline — by immobilizing the hand and wrist of the subjects’ non-dominant arm using a rigid cast (15 other volunteers had nothing done to their arm and served as controls). They trained 14 members of the group with immobilized wrists in a mental imagery program in which they were told to imagine their immobilized hand and wrist was doing specific movements, such as flexing and pushing, without actually activating the muscles. An electromyogram was used to make sure they didn’t actually flex their muscles during the mental imagery sessions. The remaining 15 people whose arms were immobilized were not given mental imagery training.

What they found was startling: In the participants who underwent mental imagery training, the loss of muscle strength associated with immobilization was half that of those who didn’t get training. They also concluded that lack of neurological activity, rather than lack of muscle activity, accounted for almost a one-third of the strength decrease in the immobilized arm. In other words, simply directing the brain’s attention to the nervous system in a specific part of the body provides sufficient stimulus to the musculoskeletal system to make an important difference.

A mind-body-bone connection?

I’ve noted before that bone strength depends on muscle strength, and most of us know that muscle strength is a “use it or lose it” proposition. This study shows how the power of the mind can be brought to bear on muscle strength — and though it didn’t look at bone specifically, if you’re supporting muscle, you’re also supporting bone. I can’t help but wonder whether a study that also looked at the effects on participants’ bone mass might not show a similar improvement in bones! I bet you dollars to donuts it would.

Better bones affirmations

Better bones affirmations

Reference

Clark BC, Mahato NK, Nakazawa M, Law TD, Thomas JS. The power of the mind: the cortex as a critical determinant of muscle mass. J Neurophysiol. 2014;112(12):3219–3226.


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