What’s the risk of osteoporosis for men?

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While I focus this blog on women and their greater risk for bone loss, it’s important to remember that men suffer from poor bone health and osteoporosis too.

In fact, some risk factors may affect men even more than women. For example, a new study highlights than men who smoke were more likely than women who smoke to have osteoporosis and fractures of their vertebrae.

How does bone loss affect men?

  • Bone density decline: Just as women do, men lose bone density as they get older. The rate increases after the age of 50, due to lower vitamin D, calcium absorption and sex hormone levels.  A low level of testosterone is associated with the development of osteoporosis.
  • Hip fractures: About 30% of hip fractures occur in men. However, mortality in men after a hip fracture is considerably higher than in women.
  • Cost of osteoporosis: Approximately 20% of the total cost of osteoporosis in the United States is attributed to fractures in men.
  • Secondary causes: Two-thirds of men with osteoporotic fractures have one or more secondary causes of metabolic bone disease, including steroid use and low testosterone.

What men can do for bone health

As more attention is paid to osteoporosis and fracture risks of men, we inevitably will see a push to drug therapy.  But the natural approach for bone health is highly effective for men too:

•    Determining if there’s a secondary cause for bone health, including low testosterone
•    Getting enough of the 20 key bone-building nutrients, with my Better Bones supplements
•    Eating an alkalizing diet and
•    Strengthening bones and muscles through exercise
•    Reducing stress and practicing meditation
•    Eliminating any tobacco use and excessive alcohol intake
•    Avoiding pesticides and plastic food contamination as they can be estrogenic and reduce testosterone

Now that you know the risks men face to their bone health, you can help family members, friends and partners take steps to better bones and a better body.  One good place to start is the Bone Health profile that is designed for both men and women.  Take it or share it now!

 

References:

Joshua D. Jaramillo, Carla Wilson, Douglas J. Stinson, David A Lynch, Russell P Bowler, Sharon Lutz, Jessica M Bon, Ben Arnold, Merry-Lynn N McDonald, George R. Washko, Emily S Wan, Dawn L DeMeo, Marilyn G Foreman, Xavier Soler, Sarah E Lindsay, Nancy E. Lane, Harry K. Genant, Edwin K Silverman, John E. Hokanson, Barry J Make, James D Crapo, Elizabeth A Regan. Reduced Bone Density and Vertebral Fractures in Smokers: Men and COPD Patients at Increased Risk. Annals of the American Thoracic Society, 2015; 150226144213008 DOI: 10.1513/AnnalsATS.201412-591OC

NOF: http://nof.org/files/nof/public/content/file/252/upload/85.pdf

 


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